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1976, Epic Dylan, and Mass Music
#1
That was all so tasty on this week's show, the huge block of 1976 music. It was the prime of my life and as Shooter noted a different time to be an artist. Millions bought records. How? Why?

Music and other art were exploding with new choices, but it was all mixed together in formats like Top Forty, so you were exposed to a vast array of genres of music instead of being stovepiped into one taste. Shooter's mentioned this before, an essential part of the equation.

Now is how should I put it? You can easily get what you want, but not always get what you need...because you really have to struggle to find music of considerable interest, people narrowcast their own minds, like rats hitting the water bottle in the lab cage. It takes effort now to get beyond the few among the vast zones of musics that know about. All too often the average person doesn't even stumble across anything but what the algorithm that drives their worldly interactions serves up. Once they find what they first like - it's all that's ever expected. Many folks miss a lot they'd really enjoy...

In 76, we had nothing like that, it was mass consumption in its early stages, where you publicly consumed media in a far more limited range of choices on the radio, in your cars (cassettes were gaining on 8 track, which was bordering on obsolete), on the LP player at home. And it usually was still a record player in a wooden console, or a portable player, but increasingly the album was played on component record players. This was driven in significant part by the Cold War, as GIs and their dependents all over the world had access to this high end equipment through the military exchange systems. Yeah, nice stuff that could really pump out tunes.

Vietnam was - thankfully - done and the whole thing wound down as hundreds of thousands of newly discharged GIs returned to college on the GI bill with their killer stereos and even the supposedly fabled last of the real Vietnamese weed stashed in said speakers. You'd have to ask Dan Qualye, he was going to school at the same time as I was a freshman...well, until I dropped out to get a, ahem, job, given I did not get along with carbon paper, typewriters, and that whole getting on writing about dumb stuff in their rather dry but renown journalism school.

It was indeed a different time and place as the rest of the Cold War went on, with music subverting the youth on both sides. Let's just say I attended some interesting parties and my dorm floor in particular had some sort of bring home the biggest bong contest I couldn't quite get the point of. And my floor was hardly alone. Music was part of the culture in ubiquitous ways that just no longer exist due to the commodification brought about by digital media.

Support your favorite artists when you can. It's not easy, they do most of the work themselves in coming up with their amazing art. It's heartwarming to me seeing how Shooter has made, not just a go of things, but an new mix that echoes stuff like Dylan's ode to Hurricane Carter - a tune so stunning I have to just stop what I'm doing and just listen, which I did and was especially grateful for. Keep up the good work, y'all.
/s/
wannabee gonzo journalist but Too Blue Collar (in 1976 BC, before computers)
Mike
Surviving in the flat earth Midwest
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#2
(10-19-2019, 05:15 PM)rebelmike Wrote: That was all so tasty on this week's show, the huge block of 1976 music. It was the prime of my life and as Shooter noted a different time to be an artist. Millions bought records. How? Why?

Music and other art were exploding with new choices, but it was all mixed together in formats like Top Forty, so you were exposed to a vast array of genres of music instead of being stovepiped into one taste. Shooter's mentioned this before, an essential part of the equation.

Now is how should I put it? You can easily get what you want, but not always get what you need...because you really have to struggle to find music of considerable interest, people narrowcast their own minds, like rats hitting the water bottle in the lab cage. It takes effort now to get beyond the few among the vast zones of musics that know about. All too often the average person doesn't even stumble across anything but what the algorithm that drives their worldly interactions serves up. Once they find what they first like - it's all that's ever expected. Many folks miss a lot they'd really enjoy...

In 76, we had nothing like that, it was mass consumption in its early stages, where you publicly consumed media in a far more limited range of choices on the radio, in your cars (cassettes were gaining on 8 track, which was bordering on obsolete), on the LP player at home. And it usually was still a record player in a wooden console, or a portable player, but increasingly the album was played on component record players. This was driven in significant part by the Cold War, as GIs and their dependents all over the world had access to this high end equipment through the military exchange systems. Yeah, nice stuff that could really pump out tunes.

Vietnam was - thankfully - done and the whole thing wound down as hundreds of thousands of newly discharged GIs returned to college on the GI bill with their killer stereos and even the supposedly fabled last of the real Vietnamese weed stashed in said speakers. You'd have to ask Dan Qualye, he was going to school at the same time as I was a freshman...well, until I dropped out to get a, ahem, job, given I did not get along with carbon paper, typewriters, and that whole getting on writing about dumb stuff in their rather dry but renown journalism school.

It was indeed a different time and place as the rest of the Cold War went on, with music subverting the youth on both sides. Let's just say I attended some interesting parties and my dorm floor in particular had some sort of bring home the biggest bong contest I couldn't quite get the point of. And my floor was hardly alone. Music was part of the culture in ubiquitous ways that just no longer exist due to the commodification brought about by digital media.

Support your favorite artists when you can. It's not easy, they do most of the work themselves in coming up with their amazing art. It's heartwarming to me seeing how Shooter has made, not just a go of things, but an new mix that echoes stuff like Dylan's ode to Hurricane Carter - a tune so stunning I have to just stop what I'm doing and just listen, which I did and was especially grateful for. Keep up the good work, y'all.
/s/
wannabee gonzo journalist but Too Blue Collar (in 1976 BC, before computers)

I finally got a chance to listen to this episode today.  Let me just say that I bought a new car a couple of days ago, and while it may not be a sports car, it's quite a flashy red Ford Taurus, and while only a 6 banger, she's got some torque.  So hearing Detroit Rock City on my back country drive today may have inspired me to see what she could do!  Hahaha!
And then....Ronnie James fuckin Dio in Rainbow?!?!  I loved that man, even if I wasn't an avid Dio listener...Rainbow in the Dark is still one of my favorite songs, though.
I also had a lot of fun listening to this episode, and it's just further proof that I was born in the wrong generation.  However, unlike Shooter, I was actually alive in 1976...just not very old.
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